Correlation of Internal & External Factors with the Beginning Period of Improvement in Idiopathic Facial Paralysis

Article information

Acupunct. 2016;33(1):57-68
1Department of acupuncture &moxibustion medicine, chung-ju hospital of oriental medicine, semyung university
2Department of acupuncture &moxibustion medicine, je-cheon hospital of oriental medicine, semyung university
*Corresponding author: Department of acupuncture &moxibustion medicine, chung–ju hospital of oriental medicine, semyung university, 63, Sangbang 4–gil, Chungju-si, Chungcheongbuk–do, 27429, Republic of Korea, Tel: +82-43-841-1738, E-mail: leetaeho0331@hanmail.net
Received 2016 March 05; Revised 2016 March 10; Accepted 2016 March 14.

Abstract

Objectives:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between patients’ characteristics and the beginning period of improvement as well as contribute to the efficient management of Bell’s palsy patients.

Methods:

The subjects were 94 patients with Bell’s palsy. This study was carried out through the use of an administrative database that included patients’ characteristics and clinical information. The analysis of the beginning period of improvement by gender, hypertension, diabetes, drinking history, smoking history and facial palsy history was conducted by independent sample t-test. The analysis of the beginning period of improvement by age, House-Brackmann grade, Yanagihara scale and period receiving Korean medical treatment was conducted by Pearson’s correlation analysis. Further analysis of the beginning period of improvement by associated symptoms and seasons was conducted by one-way analysis of variance.

Results:

  1. Significant correlations were not found between the beginning period of improvement and gender, age, season, smoking history, drinking history, facial palsy history, House–Brackmann grade, Yanagihara scale, hypertension, diabetes or associated symptoms.

  2. There was significant correlation between the period of receiving Korean medical treatment and the beginning period of improvement.

Conclusion:

In this study, the earlier that patients received korean medicine treatment after onset, the earlier that the beginning period of improvement could be seen. Therefore, for the efficient management of facial paralysis patients, it is expected to help secure a baseline.

Patient Distribution by Sex and Age

Seasons of Onset

Months of Onset

Location of Facial Palsy

Period of Receiving Korean Medicine Treatment and Beginning Improvement

Correlation Between Age and Beginning Period of Improvement

Independent Samples t-test between Sex and Beginning Period of Improvement

ANOVA between Seasons and Beginning Period of Improvement

Independent Samples t-test between Drinking History and Beginning Period of Improvement

Independent Samples t-test between Smoking History and Beginning Period of Improvement

Patient Distribution by Receiving Treatment

Patient Distribution by Beginning Improvement

Correlation Between Receiving Treatment and Beginning Period of Improvement

Independent Samples t-test between Hypertension and Beginning Period of Improvement

Independent Samples t-test between Diabetes and Beginning Period of Improvemen

Independent Samples t-test between Facial Palsy History and Beginning Period of Improvement

ANOVA between Associated Symptoms and Beginning Period of Improvement

Distribution of H-B Grade

Correlation Between H-B Grade and Beginning Period of Improvement

Distribution of Y-H Scale

Correlation Between Y-H Scale and Beginning Period of Improvement

Notes

This study was supported by Semyung University Research Grant of 2015.

References

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Table 1

Patient Distribution by Sex and Age

Age
Male (n = 41) 50.61 ± 16.761
Female (n = 53) 56.02 ± 14.443
Total (n = 94) 53.66 ± 15.644

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation.

Table 2

Seasons of Onset

Percentage (%)
Spring (n = 23) 24.5
Summer (n = 27) 28.7
Fall (n = 22) 23.4
Winter (n = 22) 23.4

Table 3

Months of Onset

Percentage (%)
January (n = 8) 8.5
February (n = 15) 16
March (n = 8) 8.5
April (n = 7) 7.4
May (n = 5) 5.3
June (n = 9) 9.6
July (n = 10) 10.6
August (n = 8) 8.5
September (n = 7) 7.4
October (n = 3) 3.2
November (n = 10) 10.6
December (n = 4) 4.3

Table 4

Location of Facial Palsy

Percentage (%)
Right side (n = 41) 43.6
Left side (n = 53) 56.4

Table 5

Period of Receiving Korean Medicine Treatment and Beginning Improvement

Receiving treatment
Male 3.24 ± 3.47
Female 3.06 ± 4.50
Total 3.14 ± 4.07

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation.

Table 6

Correlation Between Age and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period
Age r = 0145
p-value = 0.164

r = Pearson correlation coefficient.

Table 7

Independent Samples t-test between Sex and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period p-value
Male 13.51 ± 7.13 0.328
Female 15.06 ± 7.86

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation.

Equal variances was assumed in Levene’s test of equality of variances. (p = 0.052)

Table 8

ANOVA between Seasons and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period p-value
Spring (n = 23) 14.96 ± 7.84 0.359
Summer (n = 27) 16.04 ± 9.10
Fall (n = 22) 12.27 ± 5.78
Winter (n = 22) 13.86 ± 6.60

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation.

Equal variances was assumed in Levene’s test of equality of variances. (p = 0.054)

Table 9

Independent Samples t-test between Drinking History and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period p-value
Drinking history group (n = 19) 11.32 ± 4.37 0.007
Non-drinking history group (n = 75) 15.16 ± 8.00

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation.

Equal variances was not assumed in Levene’s test of equality of variances. (p = 0.021)

Table 10

Independent Samples t-test between Smoking History and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period p-value
Smoking history group (n = 18) 11.67 ± 5.40 0.09
Non-Smoking history group (n = 76) 15.03 ± 7.87

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation

Equal variances was assumed in Levene’s test of equality of variances (p = 0 054)

Table 11

Patient Distribution by Receiving Treatment

Period Percentage (%)
1 (n = 30) 31.9
2 (n = 30) 31.9
3 (n = 16) 17
4 (n = 6) 6.4
5 (n = 1) 1.1
6 (n = 1) 1.1
7 (n = 3) 3.2
8 (n = 3) 3.2
9 (n = 1) 1.1
18 (n = 1) 1.1
22 (n = 1) 1.1
28 (n = 1) 1.1

Table 12

Patient Distribution by Beginning Improvement

Period Percentage (%)
4 (n = 3) 3.2
6 (n = 2) 2.1
7 (n = 7) 7.4
8 (n = 6) 6.4
9 (n = 10) 10.6
10 (n = 8) 8.5
11 (n = 4) 4.3
12 (n = 8) 8.5
13 (n = 6) 6.4
14 (n = 4) 4.3
15 (n = 2) 2.1
16 (n = 7) 7.4
17 (n = 4) 4.3
18 (n = 3) 3.2
20 (n = 4) 4.3
21 (n = 1) 1.1
22 (n = 2) 2.1
23 (n = 2) 2.1
24 (n = 1) 1.1
25 (n = 2) 2.1
26 (n = 1) 1.1
28 (n = 2) 2.1
31 (n = 2) 2.1
34 (n = 2) 2.1
46 (n = 1) 1.1

Table 13

Correlation Between Receiving Treatment and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period
Receiving treatment r = 0 322
p-value = 0.002

r = Pearson correlation coefficient.

Table 14

Independent Samples t-test between Hypertension and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period p-value
Hypertension group (n = 28) 13.75 ± 8.12 0.599
Non-hypertension group (n = 66) 14.65 ± 7.34

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation.

Equal variances was assumed in Levene’s test of equality of variances. (p = 0.579)

Table 15

Independent Samples t-test between Diabetes and Beginning Period of Improvemen

Improvement period p-value
Diabetes group (n = 16) 12.50 ± 6.62 0.276
Non-diabetes group (n = 78) 14.77 ± 7.71

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation.

Equal variances was assumed in Levene’s test of equality of variances. (p = 0.173)

Table 16

Independent Samples t-test between Facial Palsy History and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period p-value
Palsy history group (n = 12) 16.00 ± 11.38 0.430
Non-palsy history group (n = 82) 14.15 ± 6.89

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation.

Equal variances was assumed in Levene’s test of equality of variances. (p = 0.081)

Table 17

ANOVA between Associated Symptoms and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period p-value
Postauricular pain O
Hypogeusia O
(n = 24) 13.21 ± 6.56
Postauricular pain O
Hypogeusia×
(n = 42) 15.02 ± 8.21 0.647
Postauricular pain ×
Hypogeusia×
(n = 28) 14.43 ± 7.45

All value was presented mean ± standard deviation.

Equal variances was assumed in Levene’s test of equality of variances. (p = 0.559)

Table 18

Distribution of H-B Grade

Percentage (%)
Grade 2 (n = 21) 22.3
Grade 3 (n = 25) 26.6
Grade 4 (n = 43) 45.7
Grade 5 (n = 5) 5.3

Table 19

Correlation Between H-B Grade and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period
H-B Grade at admission r = −0 039
p-value = 0.709

r = Pearson correlation coefficient.

Table 20

Distribution of Y-H Scale

Y-H Scale Percentage (%)
2 (n = 1) 1.1
4 (n = 1) 1.1
5 (n = 1) 1.1
6 (n = 2) 2.1
8 (n = 4) 4.3
9 (n = 1) 1.1
10 (n = 5) 5.3
11 (n = 10) 10.6
12 (n = 2) 2.1
13 (n = 2) 2.1
14 (n = 2) 2.1
15 (n = 4) 4.3
16 (n = 7) 7.4
17 (n = 4) 4.3
18 (n = 4) 4.3
19 (n = 3) 3.2
20 (n = 6) 6.4
21 (n = 2) 2.1
22 (n = 3) 3.2
23 (n = 6) 6.4
24 (n = 1) 1.1
25 (n = 2) 2.1
26 (n = 2) 2.1
27 (n = 3) 3.2
28 (n = 2) 2.1
29 (n = 3) 3.2
30 (n = 3) 3.2
31 (n = 1) 1.1
32 (n = 2) 2.1
33 (n = 1) 1.1
34 (n = 1) 1.1
36 (n = 1) 1.1
37 (n = 1) 1.1
39 (n = 1) 1.1

Table 21

Correlation Between Y-H Scale and Beginning Period of Improvement

Improvement period
Y-H Scale at admission r = −0 041
p-value = 0.693

r = Pearson correlation coefficient.