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J Acupunct Res > Volume 32(1); 2015 > Article
Jun, Nam, and Kim: Neuroprotection of Dopaminergic Neurons by Hominis Placenta Herbal Acupuncture in in vitro and in vivo Models of Parkinson’s Disease Induced by MPP+/MPTP Toxicity

Abstract

Objectives

This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of Hominis-Placenta (HP)on dopaminergic neurons.

Methods

We examined the effect of invitro administration of HP against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium(MPP+)-induced dopaminergic cell loss in primary mesencephalic culture and also used behavioral tests and performed analysis in the striatum and the substantia nigra of mouse brain, to confirm the effect of HP on dopaminergic neurons in an invivo 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine(MPTP)-induced PD mouse model. Animals were assigned to four groups: (1) Group 1(vehicle-treatedgroup), (2) Group 2(MPTPonlytreated group), (3) Group 3(MPTP+ saline-treated/ST36 group), and (4) Group 4(MPTP+HP-treated/ST36 group). HP at 20 μ L of 48 mg/kg dose was injected at ST36 for 4 weeks at 2-day intervals. MPTP in saline was injected intraperitoneally each day for 5 days from the 8th treatment of HP. We performed the pole test and rota-rod test on the first and seventh day after the last MPTP injection. To investigate the effect of HP on dopaminergic neurons, we performed analysis in the striatum and the substantia nigra of mouse brain after treatment with HP and/or MPTP.

Results

Treatment with HP had no influence on cell proliferation and caused no cell toxicity in PC12 and HT22 cells. Our study showed that HP significantly prevented cell loss and protected neurites against MPP+ toxicity. Although the invivo treatment of HP herbal acupuncture at ST36 showed a tendency to improve movement ability and protected dopaminergic cells and fibers in the substantia nigra and the striatum, it did not show significant changes compared with the MPTP treated group.

Conclusions

These data suggest that HP could be a potential treatment strategy in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease.

Fig. 1.
Schedule of MPTP injections, HP pharmacoacupuncture treatment and behavioral tests
HP: Hominis Placenta. MPTP: 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. NS: normal saline.
acupunct-32-1-23f1.gif
Fig. 2.
Effects of HP extract on cell viability in PC12 and HT22 cells. PC12 and HT22 neuronal cells were treated with HP extract(15.625–500 μg/mL) for a total 24 h(A and B, respectively)
Cell viabilities were determined using MTT assay and were expressed as a percentage of the normals. Values are indicated as the mean ± SEM of six replicates.
acupunct-32-1-23f2.gif
Fig. 3.
Effects of HP extract on toxin-induced neuronal damage in rat primary dopaminergic cells
The rat primary dopaminergic cells were treated with HP extract(1 or 10 μg/mL) for 6 h and with 10 μM 6-OHDA for an additional 18 h(A and B), or with HP extract for 1 h and with 12 μM MPP+ for an additional 23 h(C and D). Fixed cells were stained with anti-TH antibody and visualized with DAB. The numbers of TH-IR neurons were counted(A and C) and the neurite lengths of them were measured(B and D). Data were expressed as a percentage of the normals. Values are indicated as the mean ± SEM of four replicates.
***: p < 0.001 compared with the normal group. **: p < 0.01 compared with the normal group. #: p < 0.05 compared with the MPP+-only treated group.
acupunct-32-1-23f3.gif
Fig. 4.
The representative images of TH-IR cells for the effect of HP extract on 6-OHDA-induced toxicity in rat primary dopaminergic cells
The rat primary dopaminergic cells were treated with HP extract(1 or 10 μg/mL) for 6 h and with 10 μM 6-OHDA for an additional 18 h. Fixed cells were stained with anti-TH antibody, visualized with DAB, and photographed with an optical light microscope at × 200 magnification. Normal group(A), 6-OHDA-only treated group(B), 6- OHDA + HP 1 μg/mL treated group(C), and 6-OHDA + HP 10 μg/mL treated group(D).
Scale bar = 100 μm.
acupunct-32-1-23f4.gif
Fig. 5.
The representative images of TH-IR cells for the effect of HP extract on MPP+- induced toxicity in rat primary dopaminergic cells
The rat primary dopaminergic cells were treated with HP extract(1 or 10 μg/mL) for 1 h and with 12 μM MPP+ for an additional 23 h. Fixed cells were stained with anti-TH antibody, visualized with DAB, and photographed with an optical light microscope at × 200 magnification. Normal group(A), MPP+-only treated group(B), MPP+ + HP 1 μg/mL treated group(C), and MPP+ + HP 10 μg/mL treated group(D).
Scale bar = 100 μm.
acupunct-32-1-23f5.gif
Fig. 6.
Effect of HP pharmacoacupuncture on MPTP-induced hypokinesia in a mouse PD model
Mice were treated with saline or HP pharmacoacupuncture at ST36 for 4 weeks at 2-day intervals and with MPTP(30 mg/kg, by intraperitoneal injection) for 5 consecutive days on the 8th treatment of HP pharmacoacupuncture. We conducted the rota-rod test after one day(A) and seven days(B) of the last MPTP injection. The time taken for the mice on the rod was recorded.
Values are indicated as the mean ± SEM of seven replicates.
***: p < 0.001 compared with the normal group.
acupunct-32-1-23f6.gif
Fig. 7.
Effect of HP pharmacoacupuncture on MPTP-induced bradykinesia in a mouse PD model
Mice were treated with saline or HP pharmacoacupuncture at ST36 for 4 weeks at 2-day intervals and with MPTP(30 mg/kg, by intraperitoneal injection) for 5 consecutive days on the 8th treatment of HP phar-macoacupuncture. We conducted the pole test after one day(A and B) and seven days(C and D) of the last MPTP injection. The time to turn completely downward(T-turn A and C) and to arrive at the floor(T-LA B and D) were recorded.
Values are indicated as the mean ± SEM of seven replicates.
***: p < 0.001 compared with the normal group. *: p < 0.05 compared with the normal group.
acupunct-32-1-23f7.gif
Fig. 8.
Effect of HP pharmacoacupuncture on MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal damage in a mouse PD model
Mice were treated with saline or HP pharmacoacupuncture at ST36 for 4 weeks at 2-day intervalsand with MPTP(30 mg/kg, by intraperitoneal injection) for 5 consecutive days on the 8th treatment of HP. Dopaminergic neurons and fibers in the substantia nigra and the striatum, respectively, were visualised with TH-staining. Quantification of the TH-IR cells was performed by counting the number of TH-IR cells in the substantia nigra(A) and by measuring the optical density in the striatum(B). Data were expressed as a percentage of the normals. Values are indicated as the mean ± SEM of four replicates.
***: p < 0.001 compared with the normal group.
#: p < 0.05 compared with the MPP+-only treated group. SN: substantia nigra. ST: Striatum.
acupunct-32-1-23f8.gif
Fig. 9.
The representative images of TH-IR cells in the substantia nigra for the effect of HP pharmacoacupuncture on MPTP-induced toxicity in a mouse PD model
Mice were treated with saline or HP pharmacoacupuncture at ST36 for 4 weeks at 2-day intervalsand with MPTP(30 mg/kg, by intraperitoneal injection) for 5 consecutive days on the 8th treatment of HP pharmacoacupuncture. Free-floating tissues were stained with anti-TH antibody, visualized with DAB, and photographed with an optical light microscope at × 100 magnification. Normal group(A), MPTP-only treated group(B), MPTP + saline-treated/ST36 group(C), and MPTP + HP pharmacoacupuncture-treated/ST36 group(D).
Scale bar = 200 μm.
acupunct-32-1-23f9.gif
Fig. 10.
The representative images of TH-IR fibers in the striatum for the effect of HP pharmacoacupuncture on MPTP-induced toxicity in a mouse PD model
Mice were treated with saline or HP pharmacoacupuncture at ST36 for 4 weeks at 2-day intervals and with MPTP(30 mg/kg, by intraperitoneal injection) for 5 consecutive days on the 8th treatment of HP pharmacoacupuncture. Free-floating tissues were stained with anti-TH antibody, visualized with DAB, and photographed with an optical light microscope at × 40 magnification. Normal group(A), MPTP-only treated group(B), MPTP + saline-treated/ST36 group(C), and MPTP + HP pharmacoacupuncture-treated/ST36 group(D).
Scale bar = 200 μm.
acupunct-32-1-23f10.gif
VI.
VI.

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